Storytelling and the Seasons: Connecting Kids with Nature

Reading a picture book about animals and nature, and going on a hike through the woods: two activities that can get kids thinking about ecology and the natural world that could be even more powerful if combined.

That’s the rationale of a program at the Beaver Creek Nature Center in Fall Creek, Wisconsin. Posted along a quarter-mile, paved trail through a deciduous forest are ten large signs where pages from a picture book are displayed. As children and their families walk the trail, they can also read the story. The Trail has only been functioning for about a year and a half, now; it’s a newer project run partially by volunteers—including, recently, myself.

whenspringcomesMy role was a supporting one: I helped conduct one of the seasonal Storybook Hiking Trail events. A new story, relating to what the kids could see outside, is selected each season. The pages are scanned and organized to fit on the ten signs, and sometime during the season children are invited out to a group reading of the story as well as other educational activities. I helped get children from between 3 and 8 years old thinking about springtime by playing a few games and then eventually going out to read When Spring Comes by Kevin Henkes and Laura Dronzek, a story about the onset of spring and renewal of life after winter. It’s a very sweet, softly illustrated story that I would recommend to caretakers of young children. You can talk to your child about what they’re seeing in the story versus what they see outside, allowing them to think and learn about the natural world.

So why would reading a picture book while on a hike be beneficial to children? There are a few reasons:

  • It gets kids outside and exercising. To finish the story, they have to keep moving and walk the whole trail.bearsnoreson
  • The story is nature-themed; it helps the kids think about plants and animals and can often teach them about parts of nature. (For example, the winter story this year was Bear Snores On by Karma Wilson and Jane Chapman, which was about hibernation).
  • It helps them notice real things around them. (Another example: when talking about the signs of spring in the pictures and words of When Spring Comes, the kids could relate these to what they were seeing on the trail and what they’d seen at home).
  • The seasonal changing of the story gives children a deeper connection to the cycles of nature.
  • Storytelling is a good way to engage attention—we are naturally drawn to a story structure and, because we want to find cause and effect and see an arc of progression, we naturally assign narratives to events.

So what can you do, if you want to achieve this kind of effect with your own children? Without actually visiting this particular place, you can still use storytelling to get your kids connected to nature. Conducting this activity on a smaller scale is actually very easy: just read a story to your kids outside, maybe also encouraging them to walk a little before reading them the next page.

beaver-creek-reserve-path
Trail at Beaver Creek Reserve

For the most effective results, find a natural place (nature trail or even a park near your neighborhood) and find a story that will relate to something you’ll see outside. You can find stories about animals native to your region, animal behaviors (like hibernation or migration), stories about the weather or seasons, or even stories about the plant life or habitats. Relating the story to whatever season is going on is Beaver Creek’s strategy. This is a great activity to do with young children—one you can tailor to fit whatever ages you’re working with.

 

For an added level of complexity, perhaps to engage older kids, you can even get them to make up their own story about something they see outside—with illustrations—and then read it outdoors, having them show you what they found that inspired the story.

If you’re looking for ideas, here are a few lists on Goodreads with picture books about different nature themes: Trees, Birds, Spring, Fall, Bears, and Bugs.

If you’re interested in volunteering with children in science/nature education, I’d recommend finding a nature center, science or children’s museum, educational garden, zoo, or even a state or national park (one that conducts educational programming) near you and visiting its website. Many of them rely on volunteers to help guests or to help with special events. If you enjoy working with kids and love nature or science, these kinds of opportunities are great and the help is sorely needed.

Whether you’re trying to get involved in your community or just want to spend time with your own kids, enjoy some story time in the great outdoors!

 

To the reader: do you have thoughts on how to connect picture books to actual trips to the outdoors? Do you have recommendations for specific books or places? Do you know of other locations like Beaver Creek Reserve that host programs like this? Please share!

 

*Note: Book cover images from Goodreads. Trail photo from Beaver Creek’s website.

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